Water Maps

Peak industry body representing the $7 billion non-alcoholic beverages industry.

Join the Australian Beverages Council

Become a Member

The Queensland Bottled Water Industry’s Extraction Map

Responsible use of one of the State’s most precious resources, water, must be the top priority for all users of groundwater be that households, agriculture or industries including the bottled water sector. Ensuring the long-term health of each and every water source is in all stakeholders’ interests, and the bottled water industry in Queensland is committed to world class standards of sustainability and responsible management of the water it uses.

The interactive Queensland bottled water industry extraction map is an initiative of the Australian Beverages Council and the Queensland Government’s Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy. It is designed to provide interested stakeholders with a range of relevant information relating to water extracted for commercial water bottling purposes.

ML = Megalitres

The bottled water industry only extracts 53.5% of the total amount of water licensed or permitted to be extracted in Queensland. 

WATER-WORKER

In Queensland, more than 1,200 FTE jobs depend on the bottled and packaged water and the industry generates in excess of $300 million per annum in gross value added.

Much of the regulation associated with water bottling in Queensland happens at the local government level. Therefore, responsibility for assessing development approvals and ensuring compliance with standards for infrastructure, operations (including transportation, such as water tanker movements) and food manufacturing safety rests with the local council, where that activity is happening.

The Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy (DNRME) is responsible for the management and allocation of water in Queensland, including granting licenses to extract water in areas where a license is required. For information about the management of groundwater aquifers from which bottled water supplies are sourced visit the Queensland Government’s website.

The Australian Beverages Council accredits ABWI-certified source owners and bottlers through the Australasian Bottled Water Institute (ABWI) Model Code framework. All ABWI-certified Members must adhere to the ABWI Model Code. The Model Code ensures safety, quality and environmental responsibility. The ABWI Model Code was revised in 2020 to include greater provisions related to sustainability, alongside those related to quality and safety. Under the ABWI Model Code, water must comply with strict guidelines and is required to be tested at both the source and at regular intervals during processing and bottling. Additionally, water source owners must also maintain ABWI accreditation by submitting reports and annual audits.

1IBIS World. Bottled water manufacturing in Australia, February 2019.
2 Queensland bulk water opportunities statement, Part A- Strategic Framework, Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy, December 2019
3 Queensland bulk water opportunities statement, Part A- Strategic Framework, Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy, December 2019
4 Groundwater Investigation, Tamborine Mountain, SE Queensland, Todd, A., QUT, 2011.
5 Queensland bulk water opportunities statement, Part A- Strategic Framework, Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy, December 2019
6 Queensland bulk water opportunities statement, Part A- Strategic Framework, Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy, December 2019
7 Minister’s Performance Assessment Report, Water Plan (Mary Basin) 2006, Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy, 2019

 
 
Bottled Water has a dedicated consumer site. Head over to the Bottled Water Microsite
  • The bottled and packaged water industry contributes more than $700 million to the economy each year
  • Adult men should drink 2.6 litres and adult women should drink 2.1 litres of fluid a day (including plain water, milk and other drinks)
  • About 4 in 10 of us don’t drink enough water each day
Beverages

The Australian Beverages Council supports the industry as a whole while representing the broad range…

Read More
Carbonated Soft Drinks

Carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) are a combination of carbonated water and flavouring, sweetened by sugar…

Read More
Energy Drinks

Energy drinks are functional non-alcoholic beverages designed for busy and active people who need a…

Read More
Sports Drinks

Sports drinks are beverages designed specifically for the rapid supply of fluid, carbohydrates, and electrolytes…

Read More
Water

Bottled and packaged waters can come in still, sparkling and flavoured varieties. Many consumers enjoy…

Read More
Juice & Juice Drinks

In Australia, 100% juice contains no added sugar or preservatives. Juice drinks, however, contain less…

Read More
Flavoured Milk & Plant Milk

Flavoured milk originally consisted of cow’s milk combined with sugar, flavourings and colouring. Today, this…

Read More
Ready to Drink Tea

Ready to drink iced tea is a form of prepared tea. A number of iced…

Read More
Ready to Drink Coffee

These products offer the flavour and experience of an iced coffee, while at the same…

Read More
Cordial

Cordial is sold in a concentrated form to be mixed with water for consumption. Many…

Read More
Fermented Beverages

Fermented or brewed soft drinks are an expanding category in the Australian beverages industry. Fermented…

Read More